September 24, 2017

Olive trees victim of new bacterial infection

olive

A plant pathogen known as Xylella fastidiosa has been affecting olive trees, which are a critical part of Italian culture and heritage. The movement to fell the affected trees has been met with resistance by the locals. X. fastidiosa is a bacterial species that feeds on the xylem of plants and is spread by insects. In the past, the most severe economic effects of the X. fastidiosa were felt in the US and Brazil. Preventing the spread of X. fastidiosa requires early detection to ensure that the infected area remains small. Unfortunately, it can take 12 to 14 months for trees…

Safety concerns lead to felling of sentimental tree

concerns

A 170-year-old beech tree near a public war memorial in Mountain Ash is being pulled down due to safety concerns. The huge tree, at Dyffryn Woods off Mill Road, has recently been examined by specialists, who determined it needs to be felled because it could be a risk to members of the public, after contracting a fungus. Mountain Ash East councillor Pauline Jarman, said local people have contacted her with concerns about the tree being removed, but says she has been assured it is the safest course of action. She said: “The tree was examined by a tree specialist and was…

Solar energy project could cause tree felling

solar

A proposed solar project at a disused Long Island nuclear power plant has caused outrage, as it requires demolishing 350 acres of woodlands. “Choosing solar over forests anywhere in the world is just plain stupid,” said Dick Amper, of the Long Island Pine Barrens Society. “Solar is very important to fight global warming and beyond, but I’m afraid we’re making false choices when you destroy portions of nature and the environment to accomplish that end.” A court fight is brewing over a plan by New Jersey’s Six Flags Great Adventure amusement park to cut down nearly 15,000 trees to make way for…

CCTV installed to protect poisoned trees

CCTV

CCTV cameras are coming to West Cliff Green in the next couple of months in a bid to prevent attacks on trees. The decision by Bournemouth council comes after three trees were believed to have been poisoned in the area recently. Two pine trees were attacked last month in West Cliff Green close to the site of the former St George’s Hotel – both trunks had up to 15 holes drilled in them. A third pine has since been attacked and a “crystal-like” substance has been found on its trunk. Tests are currently being carried out to assess if the substance contains herbicides or…

National Forest 25 year anniversary

national

The National Forest celebrates its 25 year anniversary this year, after flourishing in a transition back to nature. The National Forest became a charity in 2014 in a bid to access extra funding and help secure its future, and during the same year a new 75-mile (121km) walking trail opened after five years of preparation. Thousands of people have used the National Forest for leisure and education over the last 25 years, its bosses have claimed. A plan to “breathe new life” into parts of Leicestershire, Derbyshire and Staffordshire, then used largely for coal mining, was devised in the late-1980s. Approximately 200…

Trees for Life recieve £12,500 donation

life

Trees for Life (TFL), a charity established with the aim of restoring the Caledonian Forest, has received a generous £12,500 donation from established fashion retailer Superdry. Sales of carrier bags from Superdry’s shops across Scotland have raised £12,500 for conservation charity TFL. The donations given will help save Scotland’s ancient Caledonian Forest and its rare wildlife. Scotland’s 5p charge on carrier bags in stores aims to reduce plastic bag use. Superdry has gone one step further for the environment by ensuring that its bags are made of easily biodegradable paper rather than plastic. Superdry’s Energy and Environment Manager Paul Thomas visited the TFL’s Dundreggan Conservation Estate…

Arb Association announce new CEO

association

Stewart Wardrop has been announced as the new CEO of the arboricultural association, following Karen’s farewell last month.  Stewart will be in post from Monday 2 October, although he has already spent time at the Malthouse. A Gloucestershire lad through and through, Stewart has a deep and passionate love of the outdoors, which has always played an important part in his life. He built his career in the manufacturing sector to become the European Technical Director for a large company, setting up complex manufacturing plants around the world which would supply products for a 10 year duration with a sales value ranging…

Campaigners defeated in battle for iconic tree

campaigners

A giant redwood sequoia tree in Rhyddings park, is due to be chopped down. The decision was reached by councillors this week, despite more than 2,000 campaigners expressing an interest in the tree’s preservation. The Oswaldtwistle tree is to be axed as part of a £2 million redevelopment. Hopes were raised for campaigners earlier this month after a recommendation was made by councillors at a full council meeting to retain the 50ft tree. However, at a cabinet meeting this week councillors voted to remove the tree from the park. An independent arboricultural consultant had examined the tree and said it could treble in…

Climate change can’t be reversed by trees

climate

A new study has revealed that the damage caused by climate change to trees, hinders their ability to remove carbon from the air. The study showed that climate change affects the growth of the trees. Research revealed in the publication Ecology Letters, indicates that the slow warming of our planet is weakening trees beyond repair, which will eventually turn them into sources of carbon themselves. Margaret Evans, assistant research professor in the University of Arizona’s Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, said: “It’s like a thermostat gone bad. “Forests act as a carbon sink by taking carbon dioxide out of atmosphere, but the more the…

Exotic pest spotted troubling UK trees

exotic

The Forestry Commission is asking people to join its tree health surveyors in keeping an eye out for an exotic pest. Oriental chestnut gall wasp (OCGW), a pest of sweet chestnut trees first found in the UK in 2015, has been spotted in South-East England. The impact of OCGW on sweet chestnut in this country is low. It poses no threat to people or animals, nor does it affect horse chestnut trees. It can weaken sweet chestnut trees and make them vulnerable to other threats, such as drought or other pests and diseases. England’s chestnut production industry is small, with the…