November 20, 2017

Exciting contract signed for Forst machinery

contract

bts Group, one of the leading utility arboricultural companies in the UK, has signed its first major contract with high performance wood chipper supplier Först. bts is expanding its machinery fleet after winning a new three-and-a-half year contract to cut trees in Lincolnshire.  The company, which provides vegetation management services to electricity distribution network operators (DNOs), is enjoying growth based on its commitment to delivering excellence and giving value to its customers. The new deal with Först sees bts Group add 12 new wood chippers, including the Först ST6 and TR6, to its fleet.  These new chippers mean bts can…

Council give official verdict on controversial trees

council

The City of York council have been advised that dozens of trees beside a York shopping centre should be saved from the axe but others can fairly be removed, a city official has said. Esther Priestley, landscape architect for City of York Council, disputed claims by the owners of Clifton Moor Retail Park that trees between the site and the outer ring road were hiding the shops and thus damaging trade. The owners wanted to chop down 103 trees, replacing only 12 of them. The trees are covered by a Tree Preservation Order. Ms Priestley said trees enhanced the shopping experience, but…

Campaigners shun council ignoring tree report

sheffield

Campaigners battling to save city trees have accused Sheffield Council of ‘making a mockery’ out of the independent panel Save Our Roadside Trees (SORT). The panel was established in order to assure fairness. The SORT campaign group has responded to the council’s decision to cut down trees before they were reviewed by the Independent Tree Panel, which was set-up by the council to give impartial recommendations. Campaigners have also criticised the authority for chopping down trees, despite the panel advising to save them. Last week the council’s cabinet member for environment, Coun Bryan Lodge, defended the authority’s decisions and made clear the council…

Urban trees breathe life into regeneration plans

urban

Viridor and Stockport Council have supported urban street tree planting in historic heart of Stockport, connecting key projects of the town’s wider £1 billion regeneration programme. As part of Manchester City of Trees and the Viridor Street Tree programme, 10 sweet gum and serviceberry trees have been planted on St Petersgate in Stockport town centre, helping to bring greenery and improved biodiversity to the urban environment, as well as linking key new development sites via pedestrian friendly tree line routes. The trees were planted in the historic heart of Stockport’s urban centre, delivering key aspirations from the Council’s Green Infrastructure…

Olive trees victim of new bacterial infection

olive

A plant pathogen known as Xylella fastidiosa has been affecting olive trees, which are a critical part of Italian culture and heritage. The movement to fell the affected trees has been met with resistance by the locals. X. fastidiosa is a bacterial species that feeds on the xylem of plants and is spread by insects. In the past, the most severe economic effects of the X. fastidiosa were felt in the US and Brazil. Preventing the spread of X. fastidiosa requires early detection to ensure that the infected area remains small. Unfortunately, it can take 12 to 14 months for trees…

Safety concerns lead to felling of sentimental tree

concerns

A 170-year-old beech tree near a public war memorial in Mountain Ash is being pulled down due to safety concerns. The huge tree, at Dyffryn Woods off Mill Road, has recently been examined by specialists, who determined it needs to be felled because it could be a risk to members of the public, after contracting a fungus. Mountain Ash East councillor Pauline Jarman, said local people have contacted her with concerns about the tree being removed, but says she has been assured it is the safest course of action. She said: “The tree was examined by a tree specialist and was…

Ancient 6,500 year old tree trunk found

trunk

Workers have found ancient tree trunks in Widnes, close to Liverpool. The trunks were unearthed as engineers dug up the ground to prepare for Halton’s new Mersey Gateway bridge. Workmen discovered tree trunks that are more than 6,500 years old as they were excavating material underneath the saltmarsh in Widnes. The timbers were sent for carbon dating and tests reveal that one of the timbers was 4,500 years old while another was from the Stone Age, estimated to be 6,500 years old. Victoria Pollard, environment manager for Merseylink, which is building the bridge, said the tree rings of the timbers show when…

Solar energy project could cause tree felling

solar

A proposed solar project at a disused Long Island nuclear power plant has caused outrage, as it requires demolishing 350 acres of woodlands. “Choosing solar over forests anywhere in the world is just plain stupid,” said Dick Amper, of the Long Island Pine Barrens Society. “Solar is very important to fight global warming and beyond, but I’m afraid we’re making false choices when you destroy portions of nature and the environment to accomplish that end.” A court fight is brewing over a plan by New Jersey’s Six Flags Great Adventure amusement park to cut down nearly 15,000 trees to make way for…

CCTV installed to protect poisoned trees

CCTV

CCTV cameras are coming to West Cliff Green in the next couple of months in a bid to prevent attacks on trees. The decision by Bournemouth council comes after three trees were believed to have been poisoned in the area recently. Two pine trees were attacked last month in West Cliff Green close to the site of the former St George’s Hotel – both trunks had up to 15 holes drilled in them. A third pine has since been attacked and a “crystal-like” substance has been found on its trunk. Tests are currently being carried out to assess if the substance contains herbicides or…

National Forest 25 year anniversary

national

The National Forest celebrates its 25 year anniversary this year, after flourishing in a transition back to nature. The National Forest became a charity in 2014 in a bid to access extra funding and help secure its future, and during the same year a new 75-mile (121km) walking trail opened after five years of preparation. Thousands of people have used the National Forest for leisure and education over the last 25 years, its bosses have claimed. A plan to “breathe new life” into parts of Leicestershire, Derbyshire and Staffordshire, then used largely for coal mining, was devised in the late-1980s. Approximately 200…