July 18, 2018

Cheltenham’s Montpellier Gardens to lose beech tree

beech

A large beech tree that has stood in Montpellier Gardens in Cheltenham for more than 200 years is to be removed. Several large limbs have fallen in recent years, and council tree officers have discovered that the beech has become decayed because of a serious fungal infection. A fence was erected around it in January 2013 but the tree has now been deemed too unsafe to remain. Cheltenham Borough Council said no more could be done to save it. ‘Iconic landmark’ Senior tree officer Christopher Chavasse said it would be “a sad day for Cheltenham” when the tree was removed….

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Overgrown St Albans trees are ‘blight on home’

trees

Tony Dix, 61, and his wife Yvonne, of St Stephens Avenue in St Albans, have been left without a solution to the trees that were planted 20 years ago and have seen little upkeep since. The couple have been in contact with the district council, which they say has been reluctant to fix the problem, instead leaving the responsibility to them. Tony said: “As pensioners, my wife and I were not prepared to clamber up ladders to roof level. “Nor should we have to pay for tree surgeons to carry out the work which was clearly caused by council trees…

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A review of the Forestry sector, from an investment perspective

forestry

Alex Werbowy of Alliance Trust Investments explains why sustainable investors need to be aware of their potential impact on the world’s forestry sector. By Alex Werbowy, Alliance Trust Investments “What we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another.” Mahatma Gandhi Perhaps one might think that starting this article, with such a strong moral statement may seem a bit disconcerting. However, it cannot be ignored that this has been the case in the past. It was a wood based economy crisis, which ultimately led…

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Lickfold’s dying trees population

tree

A mystery illness is killing trees in Lickfold. Now, one concerned resident is trying to force authorities into action, worried the tree population in the village is going to whither away. Simon Notley said: “I live in Lickfold and have a tree in our field that has died. “It was looking sickly last year, but this year is clearly dead. “I happened to notice a similar tree on Lickfold green that was planted to celebrate one of the Queen’s anniversaries. There is a plaque beside it. “This tree has suffered the same fate. “I wanted to find out a bit more…

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Trees out, plants in at Berkhamsted High Street

trees

Three trees in Berkhamsted town centre have been chopped down – and then multiple planters with colourful flowers in them appeared along the High Street. Dacorum Borough Council – responsible for the felling and replacement of the Italian Alders – said it had been discussing their removal since October. A spokesman said: “All three trees were disturbing the footway. “One was slowly dying, another leaned right over the carriageway and had been hit by a high sided vehicle and the third grown up and over the shop and flat above.” Trees in town centres – given that they are surrounded…

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Science and Innovation for forestry

forestry commission

The Forestry Commission’s new Science and Innovation Strategy aims to produce high-quality, relevant research capable of supporting the sustainable management of forests, woodlands and trees in Britain. We welcome your input to this implementation phase of the strategy. Your help will ensure that the commissioning of research programmes will continue to support our forests and woodlands and reflect the interests of the multitude of forestry policymakers, practitioners, researchers and end users who use and benefit from them. The discussions and initial ideas on the key issues and research questions listed here were generated by the cross-border research workshop held in Edinburgh in…

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Longevity of protected Sycamore tree threatened by dwelling

sycamore

The construction of a replacement dwelling in Cambridgeshire would adversely affect the longevity of a protected sycamore tree, an inspector concluding that insufficient information had been provided on the impact on its root system. The tree lay within a neighbour’s garden and very close to the boundary with the appeal site. It made a significant contribution to the amenity and character of the area, the inspector held, and it seemed very likely that the planned dwelling would require the removal of substantial primary branches. An arboricultural report also recommended installing a cable brace system to the tree but this was…

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Trees company: academic praised for forestry work

forestry

A Honorary Research Fellow at The University of Manchester has been awarded European Young Urban Forester of the Year (2014), by the European Forum on Urban Forestry (EFUF), meeting at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland. Dr Susannah Gill now works for Mersey Forest, a network of woodlands and green spaces across Cheshire and Merseyside which has been creating woodlands for 20 years. Working also at the School of Environment, Education and Development, she is a graduate of the University. The EFUF is a European network of experts of the science and practice of forestry, urban and regional planning, land-use management…

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Overhanging branches are blamed for obscuring signs

branches

A sign warning of new speed restrictions on a major Lancashire road has been almost completely hidden by overhanging tree branches. The maximum limit on the A6 near Broughton has been reduced from 40 miles per hour down to 30. But motorists fear the sign telling them new restrictions are in force cannot be seen from the road. Maggie Waltham, who lives in Fulwood, spotted the obscured sign between the Broughton Roundabout and Broughton village, on the northbound carriageway. She said: “I was out on my bike and I saw that where they have put road signs up to say…

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Root and branch bid to save Scots pine tree

tree

A major research project has been launched to investigate pests and diseases threatening the survival of Scotland’s national tree. Scientists from seven Scottish research institutes have been awarded a total of £1.4 million to investigate the most immediate dangers to the Scots pine in an effort to safeguard the species and prevent what is left of the ancient Caledonian woodland from being wiped out. Key strands of the pioneering project will study the impacts of two potentially deadly fungal diseases and an invading alien moth caterpillar. The research will also examine how genetic variations among Scots pines may affect their…

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