February 24, 2017

  • Dutch elm

    Research suggests cold weather could help prevent Dutch elm disease

    Trees saved by bad weather. It isn’t an often-heard claim. Yet, scientists are suggesting this could be exactly what has happened on the Isle of Man with research, newly-published in the New Journal of Botany, indicating that thousands of healthy elm trees on the self-governing dependency have avoided infection by Dutch elm disease thanks to the island’s weather being too cold and windy for the pathogen to take hold. The island has an estimated 300,000 elms and only around one per cent of them have been lost to Dutch elm disease since the fungal pathogen was first noticed on the…

  • arboricultural association papers amenity conference

    Deadline approaching for Arb Association National Amenity Conference Papers

    The 51st Arboricultural Association National Amenity Conference and the 1st International Arboriculture Conference on Biosecurity is being held on 10-13 September. A call for papers has been issued and if you are interested in a presentation submission please click the link below for more detailed information. Deadline to submit is Tuesday, 28 February 2017 The AA National Amenity Conference returns to Exeter University from 10-13 September. Continuing with our vision of collaboration, we’re pleased to announce that this year’s Conference middle day will be presented in partnership with the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management (CIEEM). With the Conference…

  • saplings

    100,000 saplings being planted in the peak district

    More than 70 people have been working with the National Trust to plant 100,000 saplings in one of the UK’s largest woodland creation projects. Look at the place names on a Peak District map, and you’ll see something missing, says Tom Harman, National Trust project officer for the High Peak. “Coldside Oaks, Hope Woodlands, Peak Forest, for example. There’s little woodland now at Peak Forest, but there would have been once. The Peak District naturally should have more woodland. It’s a huge area of land with very few trees in it, and we want to change that.” Over the last…

  • urban

    Trees being used across the world to reduce urban heat island effect

    In heatwave weather, road surfaces, pavements, and buildings all contribute to keeping urban areas around 4 degrees hotter on average than non-urban environments. The urban heat island effect occurs because the dense dark surfaces such as bitumen on roads and building materials used in cities accumulate and store heat during the day and then release it at night. One of the simplest solutions to reducing the urban heat island effect is to provide more shade, with trees. In 2012 Melbourne city council launched an ambitious project to double the tree canopy cover from 22% to 40% by 2040, by planting…

  • Dundreggan

    Survey at Trees for Life’s Dundreggan Conservation Estate reveals rare species

    Surveys at Trees for Life’s Dundreggan Conservation Estate near Loch Ness have revealed a range of rare species, including a midge never recorded in the United Kingdom before – underlining the site’s growing reputation as a ‘lost world’ for biodiversity. The discovery of the non-biting midge Chironomus vallenduuki by entomologist Peter Chandler last August brings the total of UK biodiversity firsts found at the estate in Glenmoriston in Inverness-shire to 11. Other key findings during the charity’s 2016 survey season included two rare gnats whose larvae feed on fungi. One of these Sciophila varia is only known from four other…

Latest

Dutch elm

Research suggests cold weather could help prevent Dutch elm disease

Feb 24, 2017

Trees saved by bad weather. It isn’t an often-heard claim. Yet, scientists are suggesting this could be exactly what has happened on the Isle of Man with research, newly-published in the New Journal of Botany, indicating that thousands of healthy elm trees on the self-governing dependency have avoided infection by Dutch elm disease thanks to the island’s weather being too cold and windy for the pathogen to take hold. The island has an estimated 300,000 elms and only around one per cent of them have been lost to Dutch elm disease since the fungal pathogen was first noticed on the…

arboricultural association papers amenity conference

Deadline approaching for Arb Association National Amenity Conference Papers

Feb 24, 2017

The 51st Arboricultural Association National Amenity Conference and the 1st International Arboriculture Conference on Biosecurity is being held on 10-13 September. A call for papers has been issued and if you are interested in a presentation submission please click the link below for more detailed information. Deadline to submit is Tuesday, 28 February 2017 The AA National Amenity Conference returns to Exeter University from 10-13 September. Continuing with our vision of collaboration, we’re pleased to announce that this year’s Conference middle day will be presented in partnership with the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management (CIEEM). With the Conference…

saplings

100,000 saplings being planted in the peak district

Feb 23, 2017

More than 70 people have been working with the National Trust to plant 100,000 saplings in one of the UK’s largest woodland creation projects. Look at the place names on a Peak District map, and you’ll see something missing, says Tom Harman, National Trust project officer for the High Peak. “Coldside Oaks, Hope Woodlands, Peak Forest, for example. There’s little woodland now at Peak Forest, but there would have been once. The Peak District naturally should have more woodland. It’s a huge area of land with very few trees in it, and we want to change that.” Over the last…

urban

Trees being used across the world to reduce urban heat island effect

Feb 23, 2017

In heatwave weather, road surfaces, pavements, and buildings all contribute to keeping urban areas around 4 degrees hotter on average than non-urban environments. The urban heat island effect occurs because the dense dark surfaces such as bitumen on roads and building materials used in cities accumulate and store heat during the day and then release it at night. One of the simplest solutions to reducing the urban heat island effect is to provide more shade, with trees. In 2012 Melbourne city council launched an ambitious project to double the tree canopy cover from 22% to 40% by 2040, by planting…

Dundreggan

Survey at Trees for Life’s Dundreggan Conservation Estate reveals rare species

Feb 23, 2017

Surveys at Trees for Life’s Dundreggan Conservation Estate near Loch Ness have revealed a range of rare species, including a midge never recorded in the United Kingdom before – underlining the site’s growing reputation as a ‘lost world’ for biodiversity. The discovery of the non-biting midge Chironomus vallenduuki by entomologist Peter Chandler last August brings the total of UK biodiversity firsts found at the estate in Glenmoriston in Inverness-shire to 11. Other key findings during the charity’s 2016 survey season included two rare gnats whose larvae feed on fungi. One of these Sciophila varia is only known from four other…

trees Cumbria

Tree disease threat on the increase in Cumbria

Feb 22, 2017

The Woodland Trust is urging people in Cumbria to help protect the countryside from the increasing effects of ash dieback and other tree pests and diseases by applying for one of its new ‘Targeting Tree Disease’ tree packs. Cases of tree disease are on the increase across the UK and two in particular are currently of interest to tree health specialists; sweet chestnut blight and acute oak decline. Sweet chestnut blight was first found in Kent in 2011 where it was dealt with effectively, but a small number of cases have recently been confirmed at further sites in Devon, where…